Features

New Clemson Expert To Bring High-Tech Farm Solutions

michael plumblee

A new Clemson Extension associate will help South Carolina farmers learn how to use technologies to increase efficiency. Michael Plumblee is the new precision agriculture specialist at Clemson’s Edisto Research and Education Center. He will work with growers of all major crops including: corn, cotton, peanuts and soybeans. “I want to work with growers and Extension agents to build a ... Read More »

Disease Management Q & A

sclerotinia

Sclerotinia blight, chlorothalonil shortages and fungicide resistance are a few issues producers may deal with this season. Q: Sclerotinia blight has been found in Arkansas fields. How can I keep it from spreading into my fields? A: Travis Faske, University of Arkansas, Extension plant pathologist Preventing the spread of the pathogen is the best way to keep fields free of ... Read More »

Nodule Analysis To Assess Crop Health

nodule color

The interior color of a Rhizobia-formed nodule may provide an early warning of drought and other crop stresses. • By David Hensley and Diane Rowland, UF/IFAS Agronomy Department •  One of the primary benefits of growing legumes like peanut is their ability to convert nitrogen in the atmosphere to a form that is available for use throughout the plant. They do ... Read More »

Meeting Crop Water Demand

Wasted water is money down the drain; ensure that applied water is being used by the crop. • By Amanda Huber • With top-soil moisture registering as very short in six peanut states in mid-May, producers are hoping the drought trend breaks in favor of timely rains. Rarely though is irrigation not needed at some point during the production season. “Weather ... Read More »

APRES Turns 50

American Peanut Research and Education Society logo

Society meetings continue to foster collaborative efforts and creative solutions to industry challenges. • By Amanda Huber, Editor • The American Peanut Research Education Society celebrates 50 years of work, study, research, learning and accomplishments around one of the most important and beloved crops: the peanut. To mark the Golden Anniversary, a program highlighting the past accomplishments in the industry and ... Read More »

BOLO: Cogongrass

This aggressive weed forms dense stands over large areas and can eliminate native plants. • By Amanda Huber •  South Carolina peanut farms are on the front lines for the advancing march of cogongrass, and producers are asked to stay vigilant for this invasive species. “Cogongrass is one of the most serious invasive species in the southeast,” says Justin Ballew, Clemson ... Read More »

Impact Of Rotation On Yield

galling caused by root knot nematodes

Root-knot nematode is one pest affected by rotation out of peanut. Farmers may have more success growing peanuts if they don’t continuously plant peanuts in the same field, according to Scott Tubbs, University of Georgia Tifton campus’s research cropping system agronomist for peanuts. Tubbs has studied the impact of peanut rotation since 2008. Instead of growing peanuts in a field ... Read More »

Using A Plant Growth Regulator

PGR trials

Make decisions on an individual field basis, weighing the cost against potential benefits. • By Amanda Huber • Plant growth regulators are used more extensively in other crops, such as cotton. But what about using a plant growth regulator in peanuts? Are there conditions in which a plant growth regulator could be used? What would be the effect? Read More »

Two Herbicide Options For Dryland Production

weedy field

Plus Zidua offers a residual postemergence herbicide with the benefit of a reduced rate. • By Amanda Huber • When it comes to weed control in peanuts, producers have a few options. In the past couple of years, Steve Li, Alabama Cooperative Extension weed specialist, has conducted weed Read More »

Planting Intentions

usda logo

According to USDA’s National Agriculture Statistics Service, U.S. peanut growers intend to plant 1.54 million acres in 2018, down 18 percent from 2017. USDA reported that the expectation of higher prices for competing commodities is contributing to the expected decrease in peanut acres compared with last year. Read More »