Features

White Mold Warning

white mold

Favorable weather could signal an earlier onset of fungal disease. • By Amanda Huber • It was the second warmest March on record across the globe according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. For the Southeast, the area was classified as much warmer than average. By April, conditions were still warm, and Pam Knox posted on the University of ... Read More »

Rootworm On The Rise

corn rootworm adult

This damaging pest is typically found in heavier-textured soils with more moisture. • By Amanda Huber • The southern corn rootworm is an emerging insect pest in Georgia, according to University of Georgia Extension entomologist Mark Abney. The adult stage, the spotted cucumber beetle, is easily identified. The immature stage is not and may go undetected until peanuts are graded ... Read More »

Know The Impact Of Your Decisions

peanut risk management tool

Use the Peanut Risk Management Tool to see how various production practices affect pest response. Record management choices and outcomes in the Field Log. • By Amanda Huber • A practical, easy-to-use management tool for Virginia-type peanut growers is available through the North Carolina State University Extension peanut website under the menu selection “Peanut Risk Tool and Field Log.” Download ... Read More »

Planting Intentions

peanut planting

The year started with dire warnings about an increase in virus — tomato spotted wilt virus. “Last year, TSWV made a comeback in Southeastern peanuts after a 10-year hiatus,” says Barry Tillman, University of Florida peanut breeder, in a recent blog post. “The last time we had appreciable spotted wilt in peanuts at the UF-IFAS research station in Marianna was ... Read More »

Start Clean, Stay Clean

weeds

Planting into a weed-free field, applying residual herbicides and knocking back that first weed flush reduces competition and yield loss. • By Amanda Huber • A big part of getting the crop off to a good start is managing weeds. The key is planting into a clean field and then applying preemergence herbicides as quickly as possible behind the planter. ... Read More »

Making A Stand

peanut seed

Does a higher seeding rate pay dividends? • By Amanda Huber • If some is good, then more is better is not a mantra for peanut seeding rates. Producers need to plant enough seed to provide at least four plants per foot of row. To do this, seeding rates of six seed per foot of row on singles and six ... Read More »

Planting With Precision

planting with downforce

Know the factors important for setting the correct downforce. Georgia farmers with reduced plant stands in 2019 may be able to correct those problems in 2020 by properly setting and using downforce on their planters, says Wes Porter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension irrigation specialist and precision agriculture expert. Downforce is the pressure farmers apply to their row unit to ... Read More »

Branch Named To Seed Development Professorship

bill branch

William “Bill” Branch, a professor in the University of Georgia Department of Crop and Soil Sciences and a peanut breeder, has been named to the Georgia Seed Development Professorship in Peanut Breeding and Genetics. Since joining the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 1978, Branch has worked to develop new peanut varieties to help with the battle against ... Read More »

Picture Perfect

kent craft

For early season pest management, this is an investment you can bank on. As the 2019 growing season fades into the past, growers are making key decisions for the upcoming crop. As always, it’s a balancing act between investment and potential return. “It’s always a difficult decision to make,” says Ken Craft, a grower in the Damascus, Georgia. “In the ... Read More »

In The Furrow

seeds in furrow

Take advantage of this opportunity to give your crop the best possible start. • By Amanda Huber • How many opportunities do you get to put products in furrow that will protect the peanut seed? You get one chance, says Bob Kemerait, University of Georgia plant pathologist. “Once you close that furrow, many of your opportunities are gone. It can ... Read More »