2014 Variety Guide

Variety selection is likely the single most important decision you can make all year. Newer varieties have resistance to multiple diseases, but the best variety choice remains those that will achieve a rapid, uniform stand and provide good yields and grades over a wide range of growing conditions. With so many varieties to choose from, careful consideration should go into this part of your planting decision.

Many factors affect the selection of what varieties to plant including field history, irrigation, planting and harvest capabilities, seed availability and quality and marketing. On a field-by-field basis, weigh all of these factors to determine how the variety may fit into your situation and on your farming operation.

Study the variety descriptions and the trial data. If you are thinking of planting a new variety, follow up by asking questions of researchers and other growers. Consider your own onfarm trial of a few new varieties.


Screen Shot 2014-12-04 at 11.51.55 AMRUNNER-TYPE VARIETIES

ACI 149: This high-yielding variety from the Texas A&M Peanut Breeding Program has earlier maturity, but unknown disease ratings.

Flavor Runner 458: This is a high-oleic runner-type variety widely planted in West Texas. It has slower emergence compared to Tamrun lines, but yields and grades competitively with most runner lines, especially in high-yielding environments. Flavor Runner 458 is susceptible to most diseases affecting peanut in Texas.

Florida-07: This medium-to-late runner market-type peanut was released from the University of Florida in 2006. It has shown excellent yield potential with good grades. Seed are larger and, for this reason, gypsum is recommended for additional calcium. It has good-to-excellent resistance to TSWV, some white mold resistance and tolerance to leaf spot. Florida-07 has high-oleic oil chemistry with good-to-excellent roasting, blanching and processing characteristics.

FloRunTM ‘107’: This is a medium maturity (135 to 140 days) runner-type variety released by the University of Florida in 2010. The seed size of FloRunTM ‘107’ is similar to Georgia Greener, and it produces a high percentage of medium kernels in the grading process. The variety has demonstrated very good yields and grades with good resistance to spotted wilt (TSWV) and moderate resistance to white mold. FloRunTM ‘107’ has high-oleic oil chemistry.

Georgia-02C: Released in 2002 as a new high-oleic runner- type cultivar, Georgia-02C can have later maturity than Georgia Green with seed and pod size slightly larger. This variety has a spreading runner growth habit, with excellent TSWV and CBR resistance.

Georgia-06G: A high-yielding, large-seeded, runner-type variety, Georgia-06G was developed at the UGA Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton. The variety has shown a high level of resistance to TSWV. Georgia-06G has an intermediate or decumbent runner growth habit, dark green foliage and medium maturity similar to Georgia Green. Georgia- 06G combines high TSWV resistance with medium maturity and excellent yield, grade and dollar value return per acre.

Georgia-07W: High-yielding, TSWV and white mold resistant, runner-type variety, Georgia-07W was developed at the UGA Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton. The variety has shown a high level of resistance to TSWV and white mold. Georgia-07W has a runner growth habit, dark green foliage and medium maturity similar to Georgia Green. It offers excellent yield, grade and dollar value return per acre.

Georgia-09B: A high-yielding, high-oleic, TSWV-resistant, medium-seeded, runner-type peanut variety, Georgia- 09B was developed at the UGA Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton. The variety has shown a high level of resistance to TSWV. Georgia-09B has an intermediate runner growth habit and medium maturity, similar to Georgia Green. It combines high TSWV resistance and high-oleic oil chemistry with medium maturity and excellent yield, grade and dollar value return per acre.

Screen Shot 2014-12-04 at 11.52.09 AMGeorgia-10T: A high-yielding, high-grading, TSWV-resistant, large-seeded, runner-type peanut variety, Georgia- 10T was developed at the UGA Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton. The variety has shown a high level of resistance to tomato spotted wilt virus. Georgia-10T has a spreading runner growth habit, dark green foliage and medium-to-late maturity. It should be an excellent variety for an earlier (April) planting option in the Southeast because of its resistance and maturity.

Georgia-12Y: This is a high-yielding, TSWV-resistant and white mold resistant, medium seeded, runner-type variety that was released by the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations in 2012. It was developed at the University of Georgia, Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton Campus.

During three years averaged over multiple location tests in Georgia, Ga. 12Y had significantly higher yield, dollar value return per acre, and number of seed per pound compared to Georgia 10T. However, Georgia 10T has a higher TSMK grade than Georgia 12Y. Georgia 12Y is most similar to Georgia 10T in later maturity. Both should be excellent varieties for an early planting date option in the southeast U.S. peanut production area.

Georgia-13M: This is a new high-yielding, high-oleic, TSWV-resistant, small-seeded, runner-type peanut variety released by the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station in 2013. It was developed at the University of Georgia, Coastal Plain Experiment Station. During three years, it averaged over multiple location tests in significantly less total disease incidence and greater dollar value return per acre compared to other high-oleic, runner-type varieties. Georgia 13M has a smaller runner seed size. Georgia 13M combines high yield, TSWV resistance with the excellent roasted flavor of Georgia Green and the high-oleic trait for longer shelf life and improved oil quality of peanut and peanut products.

Georgia Green: High yields, good grades and resistance to TSWV and white mold made Georgia Green a popular variety. An increased dollar return per acre compared with other runner varieties and a significantly higher percentage of total sound mature kernels (TSMK) complement the disease resistance. Georgia Green does not have resistance to leaf spot.

Georgia Greener: A high-yielding, typical-seeded, runnertype variety, Georgia Greener was developed at the UGA Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton. The variety has shown a high level of resistance to TSWV and offers some resistance to Cylindrocladium Black Rot (CBR). It has dark green foliage, intermediate or decumbent runner growth habit and typical runner seed size. Georgia Greener combines high TSWV resistance with medium maturity and excellent yield, grade and dollar value return per acre.

Red River Runner: This is a release from Oklahoma State University that has a pedigree similar to that of Tamrun OL07. This variety has the high-oleic trait and improved tolerance to tomato spotted wilt and Sclerotinia blight when compared to Flavor Runner 458.

Screen Shot 2014-12-04 at 11.52.25 AMTamrun OL01: A high-oleic Texas A&M release similar to Tamrun 96. Pods and seed are much larger than Flavor Runner 458 and a little larger than Tamrun 96 and OL02. Disease resistance is nearly equal to Tamrun 96. Tamrun OL01 may have higher sugar content than most varieties and has produced hard seed in some situations. This variety is popular in South Texas due to TSWV resistance.

Tamrun OL02: A high-oleic Texas A&M runner with yields comparable to Flavor Runner 458 and disease resistance similar to Tamrun 96 with tolerance to TSWV, pod rot and southern blight. Tamrun OL02 has seed size slightly larger than Flavor Runner 458 and lower sugar content than Tamrun OL01 and Flavor Runner 458.

Tamrun OL07: This medium-to-late maturing high-oleic Texas A&M release has improved disease resistance compared to Tamrun OL01 and OL02 and FR 458. It yields similarly to these varieties in disease-free situations, but significantly higher in the presence of TSWV or Sclerotinia blight. Seed size intermediate between Tamrun OL02 and OL01.

Tamrun OL11: This variety is well suited for the West Texas growing region and has performed well under Sclerotinia blight conditions. Tamrun OL11 has resistance to Sclerotinia blight equal to that of Tamrun OL07, and it grades equal to or better than Flavor Runner 458, which is about two percentage points higher than Tamrun OL07 on average.

Tifguard: Developed by USDA’s Agriculture Research Service in Tifton, Ga., Tifguard has resistance to nematodes so as to be characterized as “near immunity,” and it offers good yields and grades, especially in places where there would be no yield from other varieties. It offers good resistance to TSWV and maturity is similar to Georgia Green.

TUFRunnerTM ‘511’: The University of Florida released this variety in July 2013. TUFRunner ‘511’ is a large-seeded, medium-maturity runner-type peanut with high-oleic oil chemistry. It has very good resistance to white mold and moderate resistance to TSWV. Yield and grade of TUFRunner ‘511’ have been excellent. The seed size is similar to Georgia- 06G with a similar outturn of medium, number one and jumbo kernels. The growth habit of TUFRunner ‘511’ is prostrate with a good center stem. The seed supply for 2014 is limited to production of Foundation and Registered seed.

TUFRunnerTM ‘727’: This is a medium to medium-late maturing (135-145 days), high-oleic, runner market-type peanut cultivar with very good resistance to white mold, resistance to TSWV and some resistance to late leaf spot. It has a prostrate, runner growth habit with large vines and large runner seed size. Yield and grade of TUFRunnerTM ‘727’ have been excellent. The prefix “TUF” is an acronym for The University of Florida.

Screen Shot 2014-12-04 at 11.52.38 AMWebb: A high-yielding, root-knot nematode-resistant variety, Webb was developed in the Texas A&M AgriLife Research Peanut Breeding Program.

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Screen Shot 2014-12-04 at 12.01.59 PMVIRGINIA-TYPE VARIETIES

AT-07V: This Virginia-type variety has mid-oleic oil chemistry and is early maturing at 130 to 135 days in West Texas. It is not resistant to TSWV. It is an excellent size for inshell production.

Bailey: Bailey, released in 2008 by NCSU, is a medium to large-seeded and high-yielding Virginia-type peanut. It has produced high yields across multiple years and locations, which is an indication of good tolerance to fluctuations of weather and growth conditions. Bailey has a growth habit intermediate between runner and bunch types, bright pods and tan kernel color. More importantly, it is resistant to TSWV and thrips. It matures in approximately 145 DAP, just a little after CHAMPS, but it holds pods much better than CHAMPS if picked later.

CHAMPS: CHAMPS was introduced in 2004. It is a largeseeded Virginia-type peanut with a runner growth habit. It is the earliest maturing variety. Yields at early digging (135- 140 days after planting in Virginia) are high, and pod size, shape and color are suited for in-shell market. If an early frost advisory is in effect, CHAMPS can be harvested 10 days earlier than NC-V 11 with no reduction in yield. CHAMPS is less susceptible to TSWV than most Virginia-type cultivars. CHAMPS is susceptible to CBR and Sclerotinia blight. High yields and favorable pod characteristics have been observed across years and locations and, similarly to Bailey, showed good tolerance to growth factors.

Florida Fancy: This is a medium-maturing (130 to 135 days) Virginia-type variety released by the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station in 2006. It has about 85 to 95 percent fancy pods and is similar in seed size to the typical Virginiatype varieties NC-V11 and Perry, but is not as large as Gregory. The growth habit resembles runner varieties. Its resistance to TSWV is better than that of Georgia Green, and its reaction to white mold and leaf spot is similar to that of Georgia Green. Pod yield of Florida Fancy has been very good, especially in sandy soils.

Georgia-08V: A high-yielding, high-oleic, TSWV-resistant, large-seeded, Virginia-type variety, Georgia-08V was developed at the UGA Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton. The variety has shown a high level of resistance to TSWV. Georgia- 08V combines high yields, high TSWV resistance and the high-oleic trait, which is needed for the longer shelf life of the in-shell market, with medium maturity into a largeseeded, Virginia-type peanut variety.

Georgia-11J: A high-oleic, large-podded and large-seeded Virginia-type peanut cultivar released by the UGA Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton. It has a high level of TSWV and is medium-late maturing.

Gregory: Gregory has a growth habit intermediate between runner and bunch types. Maturity is similar to NCV11 (145–150 DAP). This variety produces an exceptionally high percentage of ELKs and Fancy pods. Due to the large seed size, Gregory has a high soil calcium requirement, which may result in reduced seedling vigor if seed are produced under conditions with limited calcium uptake. It has medium resistance to TSWV.

NC-V11: Under good conditions, NC-V11 has high yield and dollar value per acre. Maturity is 145-150 days depending upon the growing season. NC-V11 produces fewer fancy pods and a lower percentage of ELKs than CHAMPS, especially at early digging. NC-V11 has a runner (spreading) growth habit. It is less susceptible to TSWV than other Virginia- type varieties.

Screen Shot 2014-12-04 at 12.02.17 PMPerry: Perry is a high-yielding, large-seeded and CBR-resistant variety. Perry is less susceptible to Sclerotinia Blight and Web Blotch than other Virginia-type varieties, but tends to have high susceptibility to TSWV. Maturity is approximately 14 days later than NC-V11. Growth habit is intermediate between runner and bunch types. Perry has a pink seed coat and good pod color. Fancy pod and ELK percentage is slightly lower than for other varieties.

Phillips: Phillips is a large-seeded Virginia-type peanut with an intermediate runner growth habit. Yield has been high relative to other Virginia-type varieties. Phillips has a high content of ELKs, but it is susceptible to diseases in the V-C region. It matures later than NC-V11 and CHAMPS.

Sugg: Sugg was released in 2009. Before release, it was known as N 03091T, a line developed at the NCSU to hold multiple disease resistance. It has resistance to TSWV, CBR, Sclerotinia Blight and early leaf spot. Sugg has an intermediate runner growth habit and the color of the seed coat is pink. Sugg produces high yields and has larger kernels than Bailey. It also has good blanching and flavor characteristics.

Sullivan: Released by North Carolina State University in 2013, Sullivan is a high-oleic Virginia-type cultivar with alternate branching pattern, intermediate runner growth habit and medium-green foliage. It was tested as N08075olCT in cross with a sister line of Bailey and, as Bailey, it has partial resistance to the four common diseases in the Virginia-Carolina peanut production area: early leaf spot, CBR, Sclerotinia blight and TSWV. Sullivan has approximately 45 percent jumbo pods and 40 percent fancy pods, and seeds tan with seed coat averaging 931 mg seed1. Yields and the number of days to maturity are similar with Bailey (145 days). Seed may not be sufficient until 2015 planting season.

Screen Shot 2014-12-04 at 12.02.31 PMTitan: Titan was released in 2010 by Virginia Tech. Titan is an extra large seeded peanut with an exceptionally high content of jumbo pods and super extra-large kernels. It is suitable for in-shell, gourmet and green boiling products. Yields are relatively low if not irrigated. Maturity is considered early (only five days later than CHAMPS). This variety is moderately susceptible to susceptible to TSWV, CBR and Sclerotinia blight.

VC-2: This Virginia-type variety has a high-oleic oil chemistry with a pod size smaller than NC-7. It is well-suited for West Texas.

Wynne: A variety tested as N08081olJC, Wynne was released by the North Carolina State University in 2013. This variety resembles Sullivan, which Wynne is related to through a Bailey sister line. Wynne has partial resistance to early leaf spot, CBR, Sclerotinia blight and TSWV and has the high-oleic characteristic. The percentage of jumbo pods is 68 with 21 percent fancy pods. Seeds have a pink seed coat and average 1051 mg seed1. Just like Sullivan, Wynne has yield and maturity similar to Bailey, but significantly higher than CHAMPS, Gregory, NCV11, Perry and Phillips. Seed may not be sufficient until 2015 planting season.

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 Spanish-Type Varieties

Screen Shot 2014-12-04 at 12.05.01 PMAT 9899-14: This smallstatured high-oleic variety is a spreading growth (runner) plant type and matures about two weeks later than Tamspan 90 in West Texas. It is not resistant to TSWV. Trial yields are significantly lower than common Spanish peanut varieties. The variety can produce a prolific number of pods, but peg attachment is weak.

Georgia-04S: A high-yielding, high-oleic, Spanish-type variety, Georgia-04S was developed at the UGA Coastal Plain Experiment Station. Intended for the same market, Georgia- 04S has later maturity and pod and seed size similar to other Spanish-market types. Georgia-04S has shown significantly higher yield, TSMK grade and dollar value return per acre compared to other leading Spanish varieties.

OLin: Released from Texas A & M University in 2002, this high-oleic line is comparable to Tamspan 90 in growth habit, maturity and disease resistance. Yield potential is consistently five to 10 percent less than Tamspan 90.

Pronto: A large-seeded Spanish variety, Pronto has a growth habit typical of Spanish varieties, except that it exhibits more yellow-green color. Pronto has yields and grades similar to Spanco.

Spanco: A high-yielding, Spanish-type variety released from Oklahoma State University, Spanco is early maturing (10 to 14 days earlier than most other Spanish varieties). It has good yield potential, but does not possess the pythium pod rot or Sclerotinia blight resistance found in Tamspan 90.

Tamnut OL06: This Texas A&M University Spanish line is a large-podded, large-seeded high-oleic variety with potential use in the runner market. Maturity and yield potential are similar to Tamspan 90. Initial yield results in runner production systems appear less than Flavor Runner 458, but with earlier maturity.

Tamspan 90: Released from Texas A&M University in 1990, this variety exhibits typical Spanish growth habit. It is resistant to Pythium pod rot and Sclerotinia blight. Maturity runs about 140 to 145 days in West Texas. It has excellent yield potential.