Tag Archives: Planting

Planning for 2020

Tillage systems, twin rows and seeding rates are topics to consider before next planting season. North Carolina Extension peanut specialist David Jordan answers planting-related questions producers may be thinking about over the winter. Q Should I transition my planting pattern to twin rows? A My standard answer is that single rows and twin rows will perform about the same on ... Read More »

New Products

case fieldview

Case IH HD Mapping Case IH recently announced the expanded capabilities of the Early Riser planter lineup. New layers of high-definition (HD) data are now available with 2000 series Early Riser planters through The Climate Corporation FieldView Cab app with FieldView Drive technology. The new option removes the need to purchase a display exclusively for FieldView and allows for row-by-row ... Read More »

Replant As Quickly As Possible

spraying peanuts

Hopefully everyone has finished up planting or is almost done by now. I know we have had some seed quality issues with the crop in some places this season, but maybe yours is off to a good start. If not, remember, we recommend 6 seed per foot of good seed to have a final stand of 4 plants per foot. ... Read More »

To Replant Or Not

planting seed

As we move into late May in the Virginia-Carolina region, there are a number of things that need to be done. As one checks off the list, field (and the previous rotation), tillage system, variety selection, preplant burndown or preplant incorporated herbicides, preemergence herbicides, inoculant and in-furrow systemic insecticide treatments are in place. Timely application of postemergence herbicides, and an ... Read More »

Postemergence Herbicide Options

sprayer

One of the keys to success in peanut production is effective early season weed control. Peanut fields must be kept clean for the first 4 to 6 weeks to maximize yields. This is accomplished by the effective use of preplant burndown herbicides or tillage before planting, the use of Prowl, Sonalan, trifluralin preplant followed by incorporation either mechanical or irrigation, ... Read More »

Planting Intentions

usda logo

According to USDA’s National Agriculture Statistics Service, U.S. peanut growers intend to plant 1.54 million acres in 2018, down 18 percent from 2017. USDA reported that the expectation of higher prices for competing commodities is contributing to the expected decrease in peanut acres compared with last year. Read More »

Soil Temperature, Planting Depth

treated peanut seed

Planting has begun in the High Plains, but some producers have held out for precipitation. Adequate soil moisture is required for uniform germination. As the seed imbibes water, cell division and elongation occurs, resulting in the embryo rupturing the seed coat, and the seedling emerges. Read More »

New Products

new improved fieldnet app

Mud Rx For Planter Tires In damp or muddy conditions, planters and air seeders invariably are plagued with mud-plugged wheels from mud finding its way between the tire and disc. The operator must stop, manually remove the wheels and clean the mud out by hand. It’s a miserable job and it slows planting to a halt. With this easy to ... Read More »

Planting Speed Comparison

key considerations for planting

Adequate stands can mean the difference between great yields and average yields. Last year, seed quality and weather played a role in skippy stands resulting in greater tomato spotted wilt virus and decreased yield in some fields. Based on the quality of the 2017 peanut crop, hopefully skippy stands because of poor germination and/or low vigor seed will be minimal. ... Read More »

Consider Replanting Options

Allow original planting time to emerge, but move quickly to replant if necessary. Georgia peanut farmers who plant a crop in mid-to-late April should make a decision on a second crop within two to four weeks of planting their initial crop. University of Georgia researcher and systems peanut agronomist Scott Tubbs helps farmers make that decision. Tubbs’ research focuses on ... Read More »