Peanut Pointers

High Priorities This Month

peanut planting

There are several key issues to address in May. The first is establishing an adequate stand of five plants per foot of row and then protecting those plants from stresses early in the season. Peanuts are resilient and can survive even under difficult conditions. As long as peanut seed has good germination and is treated with a fungicide, we generally ... Read More »

Know Your Seed Quality

seed treatments

Even though spring 2018 and 2019 were opposite in growing conditions, both proved that being aggressive early and planting as soon as the soil temperatures warmed up was good. Being timely last year paid off in getting a good stand and a solid start before going into six weeks of drought that followed. Planting before the third week of May ... Read More »

What We Learned In 2019

peanuts growing in the field

2019 was not a banner year in Alabama, and many are glad it is behind us. The extreme heat and drought reduced yield and income, particularly because of the increase in Seg 3s. Acreage was down to 156,000, and it was one of the lowest average yields, 3,350 pounds per acre, in many years. We can only hope that the ... Read More »

Mid- And Late-Season Issues

With early season issues addressed, in July and August and into early September growers focus on controlling weed escapes, in particular annual grasses but also broadleaf weeds, foliar-feeding insects such as armyworms, tobacco budworms and corn earworms, and foliar and soilborne pathogens. Controlling escaped grasses almost always pays for itself because of pod loss during digging. Many broadleaf weeds may ... Read More »

Replant As Quickly As Possible

spraying peanuts

Hopefully everyone has finished up planting or is almost done by now. I know we have had some seed quality issues with the crop in some places this season, but maybe yours is off to a good start. If not, remember, we recommend 6 seed per foot of good seed to have a final stand of 4 plants per foot. ... Read More »

To Replant Or Not

planting seed

As we move into late May in the Virginia-Carolina region, there are a number of things that need to be done. As one checks off the list, field (and the previous rotation), tillage system, variety selection, preplant burndown or preplant incorporated herbicides, preemergence herbicides, inoculant and in-furrow systemic insecticide treatments are in place. Timely application of postemergence herbicides, and an ... Read More »

Postemergence Herbicide Options

sprayer

One of the keys to success in peanut production is effective early season weed control. Peanut fields must be kept clean for the first 4 to 6 weeks to maximize yields. This is accomplished by the effective use of preplant burndown herbicides or tillage before planting, the use of Prowl, Sonalan, trifluralin preplant followed by incorporation either mechanical or irrigation, ... Read More »

Be In The Know On Weeds

FloRun 331 peanut variety

Although we are still a few months from peanut planting, it is a good time to think about principles for successful weed management. Preplant and at-plant considerations are as follows 1. Know your weeds. Successful weed management starts with knowing the types of weeds we need to control. Many weeds look similar, but may respond differently to mechanical and chemical ... Read More »

Enhance Leaf Spot Control

leaf spot

By this time of the year, many key inputs have been taken care of for peanut in the Virginia-Carolina region, such as management of thrips and weeds, applications of gypsum and use of insecticides for southern corn rootworm. While weeds and foliar-feeding insects can be an issue later in the season and folks are addressing micronutrient issues and deciding whether ... Read More »

Don’t Wait On Weeds

palmer pigweed

Depending on weather and field conditions in May, there can be a wide range of peanut sizes and ages moving into June and July. Peanuts in the V-C region most likely will be four to six weeks old in mid-June. Hopefully, herbicide programs used at planting have performed well. The same is true for thrips control. For fields where weeds ... Read More »