Tag Archives: Planting

Don’t Let Up

Use an integrated approach to managing Palmer amaranth and aim to start clean. by Amanda Huber Remember watching scary movies as a kid, and whenever the main character clobbered the monster and got the better of it, what happened? They always turned to run away. What did the monster do? It got right back up to terrorize some more. It ... Read More »

New Recommendation: Spray Earlier

University of Georgia researchers say a banded application at 30 days after planting makes a season-long difference in white mold control by Amanda Huber The yield potential of newer cultivars is well established, especially after a new record average yield in 2012 of 4,192 pounds per acre. That’s the upside. Producers, Extension personnel and researchers are now realizing that the ... Read More »

One For The Books

Superb growing conditions are expected to serve up record-breaking yields in 2012. By Amanda Huber Peanut Extension specialists can point to very few problems with the 2012 crop. With harvest continuing under mostly favorable conditions, it was obvious the good weather and lack of significant, yield-robbing disease pressure means that warehouses will be busting at the seams from this crop. ... Read More »

Planting Intentions

The United States Department of Agriculture’s National Agriculture Statistics Service says, based on their interviews in late winter, growers intend to plant 1.42 million acres in 2012, up 25 percent from the previous year. Strong demand and a decline in acreage over the last couple of years has left peanuts in short supply, indicating the need to increase production in ... Read More »

Filling The Gap

When is offset replanting worth the cost? By Amanda Huber Gaps in the field are a common occurrence, and, for the most part, peanuts are good about compensating for lost plants here and there. But at what point would it be beneficial to try offset planting to fill in those gaps? Calls about peanut stand is something Extension agronomists get ... Read More »

Insect and Mite Damage

Systemic insecticides are an effective production tool. Over 90 percent of the North Carolina peanut acreage is treated annually with phorate (Thimet) or acephate (Orthene). This eliminates the need for most foliar insecticides, unless worms or mites become a problem in August or September. Systemic insecticides are applied as a granular in-furrow at planting. When foliar insecticides are used in ... Read More »

Pesticide Roundup

Belt Insecticide Now Available Peanut growers are aware of the significant role that armyworms, loopers, velvetbean caterpillar and the recent increase in heliothines and other hungry Lepidoptera species play in their fields. Collectively, they cause economic loss that university entomologists measure in millions. Now, peanut growers will have an additional control option this season with the introduction of Belt insecticide ... Read More »

Planting Intentions

Although many economists and peanut industry analysts predict a double-digit decrease in acreage, the National Agriculture Statistics Service says, based on their interviews with producers, the industry will only decrease total acreage by four percent in 2011. This information was released in NASS’ annual “Prospective Plantings” report in late March. According to the report, growers intend to plant 1.24 million ... Read More »

Maintaining Uniform Application For Sprayers

Proper sprayer operation involves calibrating equipment often and documenting it each time. By John Fulton Extension Specialist, Biosystems Engineering Auburn University Sprayer technology has rapidly advanced in recent years with new rate control systems along with technologies such as guidance and automatic section control. While these modern technologies can provide substantial benefits for farmers and/or sprayer operators, they do require ... Read More »

Primed Acclimation

Apply this concept to prime plants to be more efficient users of water By Amanda Huber In production agriculture, water is still the most limiting factor – no matter where you are or what crop you grow. But what Wilson Faircloth, research agronomist at the National Peanut Research Laboratory in Dawson, Ga., has been telling producers this spring is that ... Read More »