Features

Weed Control Options

Peanut growers are fortunate to have 18 active ingredients registered for use as herbicides. In general, these herbicides are very effective when applied at the appropriate rate and time. Failure to start clean at planting, residual herbicides that are not activated with timely irrigation or rainfall, postemergence applications to weeds larger than 3 inches tall and unfavorable environmental conditions, such ... Read More »

Planting Intentions

According to USDA’s National Agriculture Statistics Service, U.S. peanut growers intend to plant 1,751,000 acres this year, up 5 percent from last year’s 1,671,000 acres. The expected increase is largely driven by expectations of higher contract prices. Georgia is expected to increase acreage by 9 percent or 785,000 acres, but is slightly less than some in the industry had predicted ... Read More »

News Briefs

Reduced or Conventional Tillage Several key items talked about during production meetings were tillage practices and planter configurations in relation to yield. Growers are always looking to maximize yields. In deciding to change from one cultural practice to another, I would encourage growers to determine if more yield equals more profit. Many grower conversations were regarding tillage and yields in ... Read More »

Auburn, NPRL Release First Variety

The new high-oleic, runner-type cultivar is well-adapted for Southeast growing conditions. Auburn University might be relatively new to the peanut breeding business, but its just-released runner peanut variety is already winning accolades for its high yields, resistance to disease and healthy traits. The new release—AU-NPL 17—is the product of a peanut breeding program operated jointly by the College of Agriculture’s ... Read More »

Lack of cold weather means more nematodes, possibility of seedling disease.

Is Crop Production Moving Toward ‘Stacked Resistance?’  Growers urged to stop replacing one herbicide with another. Finding ways to halt the “resistance treadmill” was a key message from weed scientists at the recent Pigposium III, an event hosted by the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture focused on herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth. About 300 producers, Extension agents, consultants and members ... Read More »

Lack of cold weather means more nematodes, possibility of seedling disease.

Is Crop Production Moving Toward ‘Stacked Resistance?’  Growers urged to stop replacing one herbicide with another. Finding ways to halt the “resistance treadmill” was a key message from weed scientists at the recent Pigposium III, an event hosted by the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture focused on herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth. About 300 producers, Extension agents, consultants and members ... Read More »

Lack of cold weather means more nematodes, possibility of seedling disease.

By Amanda Huber Winter? What winter? That was the collective thought for most of December and January, with February turning off just plain hot. The cold spell in mid-March was the most consecutive days of below-freezing temperatures that the Southern states had seen all winter. While another frost could happen in April, the warm weather has University of Georgia plant ... Read More »

Minimize Thrips, TSWV

Incidence of spotted wilt is on the increase; take steps to reduce thrips pressure and risk to this disease. In the early days of ESPN’s SportsCenter, the anchors developed clever catch phrases to connect with the audience. One of those anchors, Dan Patrick, would inevitably say at least once during a broadcast, “You can’t stop him; you can only hope ... Read More »

Peanut Proud Delivers

The industry rallies to aid those in need. Peanut Proud didn’t have far to travel with their disaster response to recent storms as it was neighbors in Southwest Georgia and Mississippi who were hit by severe weather two consecutive weeks in January. Even Southern Ag Carriers, who has transported peanut butter donations to other places, was ravaged by the storms, ... Read More »

Will The Warm Winter Produce More Disease?

Regrowth of winter host plants create a haven for disease pathogens and nematode populations. A La Niña weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait says that farmers rely on extreme cold and ... Read More »